Daily Archives: May 15, 2014

Violent protest clashes in Turkey after mine blast kills over 280

Riot police run away from the flames of a fire bomb thrown by protesters as they demonstrate to blame the ruling AK Party (AKP) government on the mining disaster in western Turkey, in Ankara May 14, 2014.

Riot police run away from the flames of a fire bomb thrown by protesters as they demonstrate to blame the ruling AK Party (AKP) government on the mining disaster in western Turkey, in Ankara May 14, 2014.

Clashes have erupted across Turkey as residents rally in anger at a mining accident which killed 282 people in the western Turkish town of Soma on Tuesday. Eight hundred marched on Ankara’s Energy Ministry as police fired tear gas and water cannon.

Nearly 450 miners have been rescued in the efforts.

Violent protests have been reported in Soma itself, where relatives of the dead miners are unleashing their anger at Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan.

“Those who keep up with privatization… policies, who threaten workers’ lives to reduce costs… are the culprits of the Soma massacre and they must be held accountable,” Turkey’s Public Workers Unions Confederation (KESK) said on its official website. The body is one of the major national trade union centers in the country, representing 240,000 employees.

PM Erdogan visited Soma, the site of the disaster, on Wednesday. There, he was confronted with a spontaneous protest with locals booing and whistling at him as he made statements regarding the disaster at a news conference.

Erdogan visited Soma, the site of the disaster, on Wednesday.

“We have witnessed one of the biggest industrial accidents in our recent history… We as a nation of 77 million are experiencing very great pain,” he said at a news conference.

He promised that investigations will be launched into the accident, but he rejected claims that the government was to blame.

Riot police fire plastic paintball gun pellets to disperse protesters during a demonstration blaming the ruling AK Party (AKP) government for the mining disaster in western Turkey, in central Istanbul May 14, 2014.

“Explosions like this in these mines happen all the time. It’s not like these don’t happen elsewhere in the world,” he said.

Erdogan said that at least 120 might still be trapped. Reports from rescue workers on the scene say the figure could be higher, said AFP. Seven hundred and eighty-seven workers had been inside the Soma mine when the explosion hit a power unit.

Proteters run from Turkish police‘s tear gas in Ankara on May 14, 2014 during a demonstration gathering hundreds after more than 200 people were killed in an explosion at a mine.

The PM was soon confronted by a spontaneous protest, with locals booing and whistling at him as he made statements regarding the disaster at a news conference. Some locals were chanting “Erdogan resign.”

Erdogan was forced to shelter in a local supermarket to escape the enraged crowds.

Clashes also erupted in Istanbul, 480km northeast of Soma where police fired tear gas and water cannon to disperse several thousand demonstrators. People were gathering in the city subway and outside the headquarters of the company which owns the mine. Graffiti alleging that the company had committed murder was daubed on the walls of the Soma Holdings office, while others painted their faces black in solidarity with the miners.

A fire is seen in a street of Ankara on May 14, 2014, during a demonstration gathering hundreds after more than 200 people were killed in an explosion at a mine

In Ankara, between 3,000 and 4,000 people marched on the energy ministry yelling anti-government slogans and hurling rocks. Law enforcers responded by deploying tear gas and water cannon against the protesters.

The company stood accused of sacrificing safety for the sake of profit.

This mining corporation came out and talked about how successful they were. And then what happened? Together with this explosion, we’ve seen that no precautions were taken, the lives of the workers were not valued, and their lives were put in danger for more profit,” protester Emre Erkaslan told AP.

Riot police fire tear gas against protesters as they demonstrate to blame the ruling AK Party (AKP) government on the mining disaster in western Turkey, in Ankara May 14, 2014.

Thousands of relatives of the miners gathered outside the town’s hospital searching for information on their loved ones.

“We haven’t heard anything from any of them. Not among the injured, not among the list of dead,” a local woman, Sengul, told Reuters, “It’s what people do here, risking their lives for two cents … They say one gallery in the mine has not been reached, but it’s almost been a day.”

Meanwhile, Turkish Energy Minister Taner Yildiz declared that the accident was likely to be the country’s worst ever mining disaster.

The cause of the fire is not yet clear, according to an emailed statement from the mine’s operator, Soma Komur Isletmeleri. However, “the subsequent spread of carbon monoxide is, unfortunately, the reason for the loss of life,” according to the statement.

Turkey’s last worst mining accident in recent years was a gas explosion in 1992 near the Black Sea port of Zonguldak, which left some 270 workers dead. Since then, Turkey has witnessed to several mining accidents.

Proteters clash with Turkish police in Ankara on May 14, 2014 during a demonstration gathering hundreds after more than 200 people were killed in an explosion at a mine.

Proteters clash with Turkish police in Ankara on May 14, 2014 during a demonstration gathering hundreds after more than 200 people were killed in an explosion at a mine.

Protesters run away from water canon fired by the riot police during a demonstration blaming the ruling AK Party (AKP) government for the mining disaster in western Turkey, in central Istanbul May 14

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Egyptian expats kick off presidential vote

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Egyptian expatriates in more than 140 countries on Wednesday began casting ballots in four days of voting for Egypt’s coming presidential election.

The country’s Presidential Election Committee urged Egyptians abroad to participate in the vote, which sees former army chief Abdel Fattah al-Sisi and Hamdeen Sabahi run for Cairo’s top post.

Egyptian living in Jordan cast their ballot in the early voting for the presidential elections on May 26-27, at the Egyptian embassy in Amman, on May 15, 2014

Egyptian living in Jordan cast their ballot in the early voting for the presidential elections on May 26-27, at the Egyptian embassy in Amman, on May 15, 2014

The commission said in a televised statement on Wednesday that additional polling stations were opened in countries with more Egyptian expatriates.

The official spokesman of the Egyptian Ministry of Foreign Affairs Badr Abdul Ati said that voter turnout was “heavy” especially in Asian countries.

Salah Youssef, the general coordinator for Egyptians abroad, said the voter turnout is expected to increase through the weekend.

In Saudi Arabia, home to Egypt’s largest expatriate community, Al Arabiya correspondent reported long queues before the polling stations in Riyadh.

Egyptian ambassador to Kuwait told Egypt’s state TV that voting there was going “smooth and without problems.”

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In Dubai, Egypt’s General Consular Sharif al-Badawi said voting was “heavy.” He said the cancellation of the prior registration requirement for voting “gave the opportunity for many to participate in the elections.”

Egyptian living in Jordan cast their ballot in the early voting for the presidential elections on May 26-27, at the Egyptian embassy in Amman, on May 15, 2014.

Egyptian living in Jordan cast their ballot in the early voting for the presidential elections on May 26-27, at the Egyptian embassy in Amman, on May 15, 2014.

Nearly 6-8 million Egyptians live abroad, according to estimated official figures. But only 600,000 expats have registered to vote in the presidential elections.

Voters are required to register their names in voter lists using their national IDs or passports, the committee said.

An Egyptian national residing in Lebanon casts her vote in her country's presidential elections at a polling station at the Egyptian embassy in Beirut on May 15, 2014.

An Egyptian national residing in Lebanon casts her vote in her country’s presidential elections at a polling station at the Egyptian embassy in Beirut on May 15, 2014.

The four-day expat vote ends on May 18 and the presidential vote is scheduled to open at home on 26-27 May.

Sisi is widely expected to garner the highest amount of votes.

Egyptian nuns residing in Lebanon arrive to cast their vote in Egypt's presidential elections at a polling station at the Egyptian embassy in Beirut on May 15,

Egyptian nuns residing in Lebanon arrive to cast their vote in Egypt’s presidential elections at a polling station at the Egyptian embassy in Beirut on May 15,

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