Tag Archives: 2011 Egyptian revolution

Egyptian president to visit China On Dec 22

Abdel Fattah al-Sisi speaks at the UN headquarters in New York, Sept. 24. File photo/

Abdel Fattah al-Sisi speaks at the UN headquarters in New York, Sept. 24. File photo/

“We are looking forward to developing our strategic relations with our friends in China,” said Egyptian president Abdel Fattah al-Sisi to Chinese state media on Thursday at the presidential palace in Cairo.

Ahead of his official four-day visit to Beijing, which is scheduled to kick off on Dec. 22, the Egyptian president described Chinese-Egyptian ties as “very special, strong and stable” and commended China’s balanced policies toward other countries.

“China has balanced policies and does not interfere in other countries’ domestic affairs, which is one of the reasons for China’s success,” Sisi said.

Egypt has recently established a cabinet task force specifically for China led by Prime Minister Ibrahim Mahlab, including a number of key ministers as members, to study fields of cooperation with China. “I hope cooperation with China will be at the highest level,” Sisi said. “Cooperation between Egypt and China is not new and the purpose of the visit is to confirm and develop this cooperation and discuss Chinese investment opportunities in Egypt,” the president said.

“Egypt’s geographic location is strategic and distinguished and China has relations with the whole world. So, both Egypt and China have the right to cooperate, using the Chinese industrial and investment capabilities and the Egyptian distinguished locations,” Sisi added.

“We should work on benefiting from the depth and size of relations between Egypt and China,” Sisi told the Chinese reporters, adding that the Egypt-China cooperation is not targeted against any other countries.

Sisi said Egypt supports and encourages China’s initiative to build the Silk Road Economic Belt and the 21st Century Maritime Silk Road, adding that it represents a great chance to enhance cooperation between the two countries and that Egypt will have an important role in implementing this initiative.

“Egypt is the portal for the Arab world, for Europe through the Mediterranean Sea and for Africa, and we want the Chinese side to approach Egypt strongly,” the president continued. “The Egyptian people are ready to cooperate with the Chinese people for development, progress and peace.”

Over the past four years, Egypt has gone through two uprisings that led to the ouster of two heads of state. The political turmoil then dramatically affected the country’s economy and Sisi’s administration is struggling to put it back on track.

“It has cost us dearly,” Sisi said referring to the 2011 and 2013 uprising that led to deteriorating tourism, prevailing chaos and growing terrorist activities.

“But now the course of security and stability is noticeably increasing, so we are on the right track,” Sisi said.

In August, President Sisi gave the go-ahead for digging a 72-km expansion of the original Suez Canal as a national project to boost the country’s ailing economy, ordering “the New Suez Canal” to be open for ship navigation in early August 2015.

The Egyptian president said that the Chinese companies have great opportunities to invest in the Suez Canal Corridor projects.

Navigation for trade ships coming from China and Southeast Asia will be a lot easier, Sisi continued. “We are developing projects around the Suez Canal Corridor to provide ships with services like fuel and food etc.”

“Egypt is currently establishing a huge road network of 3,400 km within one year, besides the new Suez Canal project,” said Sisi, adding that Egypt is taking the necessary measures to facilitate a friendly investment environment to reassure foreign investors.

“We are trying to restore trust in Egyptian, Arab and foreign investors and send them a reassuring message that investment in Egypt is safe and stable and that the state is committed to its obligations with investors,” the president said.

The trade volume between Egypt and China exceeded US$10 billion for the first time in 2013, more than 80% of which is represented in Chinese exports to the North African country.

Sisi, who will soon make his first visit to China since his election in June, said that China has achieved tremendous progress over the past 40 years, adding that Egypt needs to benefit from the Chinese development experience.

“The Chinese experience is very fruitful and wonderful. It is not only us but I believe the whole world looks at China with respect and pride,” the president added. “You proved to the world that a Chinese person can accomplish what’s impossible.”

“We invite our brothers in China to come and join us quickly to put our hands together and work together for the best of our two peoples,” Sisi said.

Advertisements

Pentagon spending millions to prepare for mass civil unrest

The Pentagon is pumping millions of dollars annually into programs that set out to explore the factors responsible for creating civil unrest around the world, The Guardian reported this week.

An article by journalist Nafeez Ahmed published by the paper on Thursday this week acknowledges that the little-known United States Department of Defense program — the Minerva Research Initiative — has since 2008 partnered with universities “to improve DoD’s basic understanding of the social, cultural, behavioral and political forces that shape regions of the world of strategic importance to the US.”

According to the program’s website, it has recently awarded millions of dollars to be divvied up among 12 proposals from colleges that have launched projects relevant to the Pentagon’s interest, including a Cornell University study called “Tracking Critical-Mass Outbreaks in Social Contagions” as well as others involving state stability, social disequilibrium and, in one instance, “Understanding American Muslims Converts in the Contexts of Security and Society.” The funding all comes entirely from the Dept. of Defense.

“Understanding the Origin, Characteristics and Implications of Mass Political Movements,” a study out of the University of Washington, was among those selected as well. In Lowell, Massachusetts, researchers there will use $2 million from the Pentagon to study terrorist behavior.

“This research is intended to identify precisely how children get involved and how to interrupt and stop the process,” UMass Lowell Professor Mia Bloom told the Lowell Sun of her Initiative-accepted project. “The research will contrast children in terrorist groups with child soldiers and children in gangs to better understand how they are alike and how they differ.”

Jonathan Moyer of the Pardee Center for International Futures in the School of International Studies at the University of Denver told a campus publication at that school last month that a project he is involved with — one that will also now receive Pentagon funding — will “hopefully help us understand instability in middle-income countries, not just the low-income countries.”

“Trying to pull out the Tunisias and the Libyas and the Ukraines,” he told the Pardee Center, “and why they might be unstable.”

“The total funds awarded for this set of projects is expected to be around six million dollars in the first year and $17 million over three years,” the Minerva Initiative acknowledged on its website.

Writing for The Guardian, Ahmed investigated these programs further and determined that many are directly involved in mass protests and other acts of civil unrest witnessed by the world in recent years. The Cornell project, for example, will determine “the critical mass (tipping point)” of social contagians by studying their “digital traces” in the cases of “the 2011 Egyptian revolution, the 2011 Russian Duma elections, the 2012 Nigerian fuel subsidy crisis and the 2013 Gazi park protests in Turkey,” Ahmed wrote. To accomplish as much, researchers say they will examine social media conversations such as Twitter posts “to identify individuals mobilized in a social contagion and when they become mobilized.”

Another project, Ahmed added, is managed by the US Army Research Office and focuses in “large-scale movements involving more than 1,000 participants in enduring activity” across 58 countries around the globe.

The Pentagon’s overseeing of academic projects like these have raised eyebrows before, and even earned the ire of the American Anthropological Society due to its concerns with where the funding comes from.

“The Department of Defense takes seriously its role in the security of the United States, its citizens, and US allies and partners,” Dr Erin Fitzgerald, the Minerva Initiative’s director, told The Guardian. “While every security challenge does not cause conflict, and every conflict does not involve the US military, Minerva helps fund basic social science research that helps increase the Department of Defense’s understanding of what causes instability and insecurity around the world. By better understanding these conflicts and their causes beforehand, the Department of Defense can better prepare for the dynamic future security environment.”

 

Pentagon preparing for mass civil breakdown

The Pentagon is funding social science research to model risks of “social contagions” that could damage US strategic interests

The Pentagon is funding social science research to model risks of “social contagions” that could damage US strategic interests

Social science is being militarised to develop ‘operational tools’ to target peaceful activists and protest movements

A US Department of Defense (DoD) research programme is funding universities to model the dynamics, risks and tipping points for large-scale civil unrest across the world, under the supervision of various US military agencies. The multi-million dollar programme is designed to develop immediate and long-term “warfighter-relevant insights” for senior officials and decision makers in “the defense policy community,” and to inform policy implemented by “combatant commands.”

Launched in 2008 – the year of the global banking crisis – the DoD ‘Minerva Research Initiative’ partners with universities “to improve DoD’s basic understanding of the social, cultural, behavioral, and political forces that shape regions of the world of strategic importance to the US.”

Among the projects awarded for the period 2014-2017 is a Cornell University-led study managed by the US Air Force Office of Scientific Research which aims to develop an empirical model “of the dynamics of social movement mobilisation and contagions.” The project will determine “the critical mass (tipping point)” of social contagians by studying their “digital traces” in the cases of “the 2011 Egyptian revolution, the 2011 Russian Duma elections, the 2012 Nigerian fuel subsidy crisis and the 2013 Gazi park protests in Turkey.”

Twitter posts and conversations will be examined “to identify individuals mobilised in a social contagion and when they become mobilised.”

Another project awarded this year to the University of Washington “seeks to uncover the conditions under which political movements aimed at large-scale political and economic change originate,” along with their “characteristics and consequences.” The project, managed by the US Army Research Office, focuses on “large-scale movements involving more than 1,000 participants in enduring activity,” and will cover 58 countries in total.

Last year, the DoD’s Minerva Initiative funded a project to determine ‘Who Does Not Become a Terrorist, and Why?’ which, however, conflates peaceful activists with “supporters of political violence” who are different from terrorists only in that they do not embark on “armed militancy” themselves. The project explicitly sets out to study non-violent activists:

“In every context we find many individuals who share the demographic, family, cultural, and/or socioeconomic background of those who decided to engage in terrorism, and yet refrained themselves from taking up armed militancy, even though they were sympathetic to the end goals of armed groups. The field of terrorism studies has not, until recently, attempted to look at this control group. This project is not about terrorists, but about supporters of political violence.”

The project’s 14 case studies each “involve extensive interviews with ten or more activists and militants in parties and NGOs who, though sympathetic to radical causes, have chosen a path of non-violence.”

I contacted the project’s principal investigator, Prof Maria Rasmussen of the US Naval Postgraduate School, asking why non-violent activists working for NGOs should be equated to supporters of political violence – and which “parties and NGOs” were being investigated – but received no response.

Similarly, Minerva programme staff refused to answer a series of similar questions I put to them, including asking how “radical causes” promoted by peaceful NGOs constituted a potential national security threat of interest to the DoD.

Among my questions, I asked:

“Does the US Department of Defense see protest movements and social activism in different parts of the world as a threat to US national security? If so, why? Does the US Department of Defense consider political movements aiming for large scale political and economic change as a national security matter? If so, why? Activism, protest, ‘political movements’ and of course NGOs are a vital element of a healthy civil society and democracy – why is it that the DoD is funding research to investigate such issues?”

Minerva’s programme director Dr Erin Fitzgerald said “I appreciate your concerns and am glad that you reached out to give us the opportunity to clarify” before promising a more detailed response. Instead, I received the following bland statement from the DoD’s press office:

“The Department of Defense takes seriously its role in the security of the United States, its citizens, and US allies and partners. While every security challenge does not cause conflict, and every conflict does not involve the US military, Minerva helps fund basic social science research that helps increase the Department of Defense’s understanding of what causes instability and insecurity around the world. By better understanding these conflicts and their causes beforehand, the Department of Defense can better prepare for the dynamic future security environment.”

In 2013, Minerva funded a University of Maryland project in collaboration with the US Department of Energy‘s Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to gauge the risk of civil unrest due to climate change. The three-year $1.9 million project is developing models to anticipate what could happen to societies under a range of potential climate change scenarios.

From the outset, the Minerva programme was slated to provide over $75 million over five years for social and behavioural science research. This year alone it has been allocated a total budget of $17.8 million by US Congress.

An internal Minerva staff email communication referenced in a 2012 Masters dissertation reveals that the programme is geared toward producing quick results that are directly applicable to field operations. The dissertation was part of a Minerva-funded project on “counter-radical Muslim discourse” at Arizona State University.

The internal email from Prof Steve Corman, a principal investigator for the project, describes a meeting hosted by the DoD’s Human Social Cultural and Behavioural Modeling (HSCB) programme in which senior Pentagon officials said their priority was “to develop capabilities that are deliverable quickly” in the form of “models and tools that can be integrated with operations.”

Although Office of Naval Research supervisor Dr Harold Hawkins had assured the university researchers at the outset that the project was merely “a basic research effort, so we shouldn’t be concerned about doing applied stuff”, the meeting in fact showed that DoD is looking to “feed results” into “applications,” Corman said in the email. He advised his researchers to “think about shaping results, reports, etc., so they [DoD] can clearly see their application for tools that can be taken to the field.”

Many independent scholars are critical of what they see as the US government’s efforts to militarise social science in the service of war. In May 2008, the American Anthropological Association (AAA) wrote to the US government noting that the Pentagon lacks “the kind of infrastructure for evaluating anthropological [and other social science] research” in a way that involves “rigorous, balanced and objective peer review”, calling for such research to be managed instead by civilian agencies like the National Science Foundation (NSF).

The following month, the DoD signed a memorandum of understanding (MoU) with the NSF to cooperate on the management of Minerva. In response, the AAA cautioned that although research proposals would now be evaluated by NSF’s merit-review panels. “Pentagon officials will have decision-making power in deciding who sits on the panels”:

“… there remain concerns within the discipline that research will only be funded when it supports the Pentagon’s agenda. Other critics of the programme, including the Network of Concerned Anthropologists, have raised concerns that the programme would discourage research in other important areas and undermine the role of the university as a place for independent discussion and critique of the military.”

According to Prof David Price, a cultural anthropologist at St Martin’s University in Washington DC and author of Weaponizing Anthropology: Social Science in Service of the Militarized State, “when you looked at the individual bits of many of these projects they sort of looked like normal social science, textual analysis, historical research, and so on, but when you added these bits up they all shared themes of legibility with all the distortions of over-simplification. Minerva is farming out the piece-work of empire in ways that can allow individuals to disassociate their individual contributions from the larger project.”

Prof Price has previously exposed how the Pentagon’s Human Terrain Systems (HTS) programme – designed to embed social scientists in military field operations – routinely conducted training scenarios set in regions “within the United States.”

Citing a summary critique of the programme sent to HTS directors by a former employee, Price reported that the HTS training scenarios “adapted COIN [counterinsurgency] for Afghanistan/Iraq” to domestic situations “in the USA where the local population was seen from the military perspective as threatening the established balance of power and influence, and challenging law and order.”

One war-game, said Price, involved environmental activists protesting pollution from a coal-fired plant near Missouri, some of whom were members of the well-known environmental NGO Sierra Club. Participants were tasked to “identify those who were ‘problem-solvers’ and those who were ‘problem-causers,’ and the rest of the population whom would be the target of the information operations to move their Center of Gravity toward that set of viewpoints and values which was the ‘desired end-state’ of the military’s strategy.”

Such war-games are consistent with a raft of Pentagon planning documents which suggest that National Security Agency (NSA) mass surveillance is partially motivated to prepare for the destabilising impact of coming environmental, energy and economic shocks.

James Petras, Bartle Professor of Sociology at Binghamton University in New York, concurs with Price’s concerns. Minerva-funded social scientists tied to Pentagon counterinsurgency operations are involved in the “study of emotions in stoking or quelling ideologically driven movements,” he said, including how “to counteract grassroots movements.”

Minerva is a prime example of the deeply narrow-minded and self-defeating nature of military ideology. Worse still, the unwillingness of DoD officials to answer the most basic questions is symptomatic of a simple fact – in their unswerving mission to defend an increasingly unpopular global system serving the interests of a tiny minority, security agencies have no qualms about painting the rest of us as potential terrorists.

Dr. Nafeez Ahmed is an international security journalist and academic. He is the author of A User’s Guide to the Crisis of Civilization: And How to Save It, and the forthcoming science fiction thriller, ZERO POINT.

Breaking news – Series of explosions rock rally at Cairo University, 3 killed

A third blast has gone off near Cairo University, killing at least one. It follows two explosions which killed a police brigadier-general and a civilian during student protest.

At least four other police officers were wounded in the blasts, which went off near a parked police vehicle.

Officials said that the twin bombs went off within seconds of each other. The interior ministry said the bombs were hidden with other officials saying the devices had been concealed in a tree between two security posts.

DETAILS TO FOLLOW

The moment of the second explosion has been caught on tape. 

Egyptian state television said that the double explosions happened outside Cairo University’s engineering facility during clashes between security forces and students. It described the devices as crude and homemade.

Egypt’s security forces have been the target of frequent attacks since a military backed coup toppled President Mohamed Morsi last July. Although attacks have mainly been on the restive Sinai Peninsula, they have begun to spread to major urban areas like Cairo.

Morsi’s supporters have staged regular protests against the military appointed government, which the authorities say have killed almost 500 people, most of them police and soldiers.

DETAILS TO FOLLOW

Egypt police brigadier-general Tarek El- merjawy killed in Cairo blasts

Brigadier General Tarek El-Mergawy shortly after explosion

Brigadier General Tarek El-Mergawy shortly after explosion

Egyptian police brigadier-general Tarek El-merjawy was killed as two blasts hit outside Cairo University on Wednesday, state television said. Four police officers were wounded in an attack on a police vehicle, Reuters reported, citing security officials

 

Enhanced by Zemanta

Sisi stays as defence minister in Egypt’s new cabinet

20 ministers from El-Beblawi’s cabinet keep their posts, while 11 ministers are fresh appointees

New Egypt Cabinet

New Egypt Cabinet

Egypt’s new government was sworn in Saturday in a limited reshuffle that kept the powerful ministers of defense and interior in place under a new prime minister named days earlier.

State television aired the ministers being sworn in live from the presidential palace, led by new Prime Minister Ibrahim Mehlib, the outgoing housing minister,

The new Cabinet keeps Field Marshal Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi as the country’s defense minister. The 59-year-old el-Sissi is widely expected to run for president in elections expected by April.

Interior Minister Mohammed Ibrahim, who oversees the country’s police, also remains in place despite wide criticism of his performance in handling rising violence

The reshuffle comes after the surprise resignation Monday of the Cabinet, including then-Prime Minister Hazem el-Beblawi.

The change of government before the presidential vote appeared orchestrated to curb rising criticism of the outgoing Cabinet, which was accused of failing to stem widening labor strikes and continued protests. It also would spare el-Sissi the disruption associated with forming a new one if he becomes president. Parliamentary elections are expected by the summer, after which a new government is likely to be formed.

In the new lineup, Mehlib kept 20 ministers from el-Beblawi’s government and appointed 11 new ones, mostly technocrats. The new Cabinet includes three Christians and four women, but no Islamists. It removes most ministers who were members of political parties formed after the 2011 ouster of Mubarak.

This new interim government is the sixth since 2011. It’s also the second interim government after Morsi’s ouster.

The new Cabinet will face a host of challenges ranging from Egypt’s unstable security situation to a battered economy drained of resources.

Ministers from El-Beblawi’s government who will remain in their posts are:

1. Minister of Defence Abdel-Fatah El-Sisi
2. Minister of Interior Mohamed Ibrahim
3. Minister of Tourism Hisham Zazou
4. Minister of Transportation Ibrahim Domeiri
5. Minister of Communication Atef Helmy
6. Minister of Local Development Adel Labib
7. Minister of Agriculture Ayman Abu Hadid
8. Minister of Antiquities Mohamed Ibrahim
9. Minister of Transitional Justice and National Reconciliation Amin A-Mahdy
10. Minister of Industry, Trade and Investment Mounir Fakhry Abdel-Noor.
11. Minister of Culture Saber Arab
12. Minister of Minister of Planning and International Cooperation Ashraf El-Arabi
13. Minister of Foreign Affairs Nabil Fahmy
14. Minister of Information Doreya Sharaf El-Din
15. Minister of Environment Laila Iskandar
16. Minister of Petroleum Sherif Ismail
17.Minister of Religious Endowments Mokhtar Gomaa
18.Minister of Education Mahmoud Abou El-Nasr
19. Minister of Irrigation and Water Resources Mohamed Abdel-Moteleb
20. Minister of Sports and Youth Khaled Abdel-Aziz

Newly appointed ministers:

1. Minister of Justice Nayer Abdel-Moneim Othman
2. Minister of Military Production Ibrahim Younis
3. Minister of Health Adel El-Adawi
4. Minister of Housing Mostafa Madbouli
5. Minister of Higher Education and Scientific Research Wael El-Degwi
6. Minister of Manpower Nahed Ashri
7. Minister of Supply Khaled Hanafy
8. Minister of Electricity Mohamed Shaker
9. Minister of Finance Hani Qadri Demian
10. Minister of Social Solidarity Ghada Wali
11. Minister of Aviation Mohamed Hossam Kamal

Enhanced by Zemanta

Rep. Bachmann Calls on Obama to Label Muslim Brotherhood A ‘Terrorist Organization’

U.S. Rep. Michele Bachmann called on the administration President Obama to follow Egypt’s example and designate the Muslim Brotherhood a terrorist group.

In an article last week in the Daily News Egypt, the Republican member of the U.S. House of Representatives and former presidential candidate described the history of the Muslim Brotherhood as full of violence and terrorism.

“From the time of Hassan al-Banna and the ‘secret apparatus’ staging terror attacks across Egypt and the assassinations of Prime Minister Mahmoud an-Nukrashi Pasha and judge Ahmed El-Khazindar in 1948, to the ongoing attacks on Coptic Christians and churches and the terror campaign targeting the military in the Sinai and elsewhere, the Muslim Brotherhood has always kept terrorism as part of its arsenal and living up to their motto, ‘Jihad is our way,'” Bachmann wrote.

She added that the Brotherhood engages in a two-faced policy of publicly condemning terrorism to media outlets in the West, and then supporting terrorism when they think no one is looking. When they get caught, the predictable response is to claim that they were misquoted or taken out of context. Alain Chouet, the former head of the French Security Intelligence Service, observed that “like every fascist movement on the trail to power, the Brotherhood has achieved perfect fluency in double-speak.”

Bachmann added after the January revolution, the Obama administration and the American media fell for this double-speak, embracing the so-called “moderate Muslim Brotherhood.” But as the people of Egypt quickly discovered, they were anything but moderate.

Obama and his brother Malik " member of the terrorist organization the Muslim Brotherhood " in the White House

Obama and his brother Malik ” member of the terrorist organization  Muslim Brotherhood ” in the White House

“Under former President Morsi’s brief tenure, the Muslim Brotherhood’s program of extremism was given a green light. One of Morsi’s first agenda items was to demand the release of convicted terrorist leader Shiek Omar Abdel Rahman from American prison. Morsi also released scores of convicted terrorists from Egyptian jails,” she noted.

Last week article in the Daily News Egypt, with Michele Bachmann

By Michele Bachmann

If the decision of the interim government of Egypt is to consider the organisation of the Muslim Brotherhood a terrorist organisation, then the United States should follow.

From the time of Hassan al-Banna and the “secret apparatus” staging terror attacks across Egypt and the assassinations of Prime Minister Mahmoud an-Nukrashi Pasha and judge Ahmed El-Khazindar in 1948, to the ongoing attacks on Coptic Christians and churches and the terror campaign targeting the military in the Sinai and elsewhere, the Muslim Brotherhood has always kept terrorism as part of its arsenal and living up to their motto, “Jihad is our way.”

We’ve seen the Brotherhood engage in a two-faced policy of publicly condemning terrorism to media outlets in the West, and then supporting terrorism when they think no one is looking. When they get caught, the predictable response is to claim that they were misquoted or taken out of context. This is why Alain Chouet, the former head of the French Security Intelligence Service, observed that “like every fascist movement on the trail to power, the Brotherhood has achieved perfect fluency in double-speak.”

After the 25 January Revolution, the Obama administration and the American media fell for this double-speak, embracing the so-called “moderate Muslim Brotherhood.”

But as the people of Egypt quickly discovered, they were anything but moderate. Under former President Morsi’s brief tenure, the Muslim Brotherhood’s program of extremism was given a green light. Following his election, one of Morsi’s first agenda items was to demand the release of convicted terrorist leader Shiek Omar Abdel Rahman from American prison. The “Blind Sheik” was convicted in his role in federal court for his leadership role in authorising the 1993 World Trade Center bombing and the planned follow-up “Day of Terror” attack. Morsi also released scores of convicted terrorists from Egyptian jails.

Under the Morsi regime attacks against women and religious minorities, including Coptic Christians and Shi’ites, increased dramatically with no response from the government. In April, when mobs and police attacked a funeral at St. Mark’s Cathedral, killing at least one mourner, one of Morsi’s top aides took to Facebook to blame the Coptic Christians for the attacks. The Brotherhood’s Freedom and Justice Party have continued to incite violence against the Coptic community since Morsi’s removal

When Morsi issued his 22 November, 2012 declaration claiming that his power was beyond the review of the courts and that all his decrees could not be appealed – effectively declaring himself dictator – the Obama administration issued no condemnations. As protestors were being tortured by Muslim Brotherhood cadres in front of the presidential palace, the United States was continuing with plans to send planes, tanks, tear gas and financial aid to the Morsi regime over the protests from myself and many of my colleagues in both chambers of the United States Congress.

As Egyptians were being jailed and tried for “defamation” and “insulting the president” and after Morsi appointed a former Jamaa Islamiya terrorist leader as governor of the Luxor Governorate, where his terror group had attacked and killed 62 tourists in 1997, Obama’s Ambassador to Egypt Anne Patterson gave a speech in Cairo just days before the 30 June Tamarod protests continuing to back Morsi and the Muslim Brotherhood.

In October 2003, the former counter-terrorism “czar” for both President Bill Clinton and George W. Bush, Richard Clarke, testified before the US Senate that virtually every Islamic terrorist organisation in the world had in common membership and inspiration from the ideology of the Muslim Brotherhood. Not only has virtually every leader of Al-Qaeda passed through the ranks of the Muslim Brotherhood, but several of the 9/11 hijackers, including ringleader Mohamed Atta, were known to have been radicalised through the Brotherhood.

In February 2011, just days after Mubarak announced he was stepping down, Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) Director Robert Mueller told the U.S. House of Representatives Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence that “elements of the Muslim Brotherhood both here and overseas have supported terrorism.”

The move in Egypt to designate the Muslim Brotherhood a terrorist organisation is one born out of urgent necessity and the group’s long history of terror. If this decision is made by the Egyptian government then the United States should follow. The designation of the Muslim Brotherhood as a terrorist organisation is warranted and long overdue.

Michele Bachmann is an American Republican member of the United States House of Representatives, representing Minnesota’s 6th congressional district, and a former U.S. presidential candidate.

Morsy’s detention renewed for 30 days for Wadi al-Natrun prison break | Egypt Independent

A court has renewed the detention of toppled President Mohamed Morsy for another 30 days over the Wadi al-Natrun prison break during the January 2011 revolution.
An investigation judge considered renewing Morsy’s detention in a session held inside Borg al-Arab prison, where Morsy is currently imprisoned, in the presence of two defense lawyers. Morsy refused to allow any lawyer to represent him, arguing that he is still the legitimate president of the country, according to the suspended 2012 Constitution.
Part of the case, accusing Morsy and others of espionage, has been referred to State Security prosecutors.
Morsy and other Muslim Brotherhood leaders face charges of inciting and assisting in attacks on police installations, officers and soldiers, the storming of Egyptian prisons and the arson of Wadi al-Natrun.
Other charges include damaging prison records, deliberately killing prisoners, officers and soldiers and enabling other prisoners to escape.
Morsi also is further accused of “conspiring” with the Gaza-based Palestinian resistance group Hamas to carry out “hostile acts” inside Egypt.

Morsy’s detention renewed for 30 days for Wadi al-Natrun prison break | Egypt Independent.