Tag Archives: Lunar eclipse

‘BLOOD MOON’ RISING Total lunar eclipse to take center stage in night sky -Total Lunar Eclipse Special- Live

Started on Apr 15, 2014

On the night of April 14th, two significant and spectacular events will take place simultaneously, as Mars reaches its closest point to Earth while the Moon will be totally eclipsed. Slooh will present these events in real time, starting with coverage of Mars at 7 PM PDT / 10 PM EDT / 02 UTC (4/15) (International Times) from Slooh’s telescopes off the west coast of Africa in the Canary Islands and transitioning to coverage of the Total Lunar Eclipse starting at 11 PM PDT / 2 AM EDT (4/15) / 06 UTC (4/15) (International Times) with live feeds from throughout North America. Viewers can watch free on Slooh.com or by downloading the Slooh iPad app. The live image stream will be hosted by Slooh Observatory Director Paul Cox and Slooh astronomer Bob Berman, who will be reporting live from Prescott Observatory in Prescott, Arizona. Viewers can ask questions during the show by using hashtag #Slooh.

A wide range of experts will join Slooh during five full hours of programming, including astronomy luminary and bestselling author Timothy Ferris, author of “Seeing in the Dark”, and Professor Emeritus of Astronomy at UC Berkeley, and documentary filmmaker Duncan Copp, producer of the award winning film, “In the Shadow of the Moon”. This is the latest in a series of total lunar eclipse broadcasts dating back to Slooh’s founding in 2003, the highlights of which are a June 2011 broadcast that was featured in the Google Doodle and a December 2010 eclipse broadcast live on the largest jumbotron in Times Square.

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NASA: Beautiful blood moon, when lunar eclipse comes Tuesday

Blood-Moon-jpg(CNN) — Prophecy loves signs from the heavens, and they will deliver Tuesday with a moonlight spectacle.

What will happen could sound sort of like this:

The moon will turn to blood as it aligns with Earth and sun
Then do so thrice more ere a year and a half is done,
‘Tis not the herald of the apocalypses
Just the first of four total lunar eclipses.

In other words, get ready for an unusually beautiful moon to grace the night skies next week. There will be a total lunar eclipse Tuesday that will turn the moon a burnt reddish orange, NASA says.

It’s called a blood moon, and this one is just the first in a series of four consecutive total eclipses.

Within a year and a half, North America will be able to see a blood moon a total of four times. The moon takes on this color during the eclipse as it passes through the Earth’s shadow, which is the color of a desert sunset.

The four blood moons will occur in roughly six-month intervals on the following dates: April 15, 2014; October 8, 2014; April 4, 2015, and September 28, 2015.

With that frequency, one might be misled into thinking that they are commonplace.

There are about two lunar eclipses per year, NASA says. Some of them — penumbral eclipses — are so subtle, they are vaguely visible and go greatly unnoticed.

Other eclipses just cast a partial shadow on the moon but lend it none of that brilliant sunset hue.

Lunar eclipses — penumbral, partial or umbral — occur in random order, NASA says. Getting four umbral eclipses in a row is like drawing a rare lunar poker hand of four of a kind.

Just like the poker players, astronomers have a name for that lucky draw. It’s called a tetrad, NASA says.

“The most unique thing about the 2014-2015 tetrad is that all of them are visible for all or parts of the USA,” longtime NASA eclipse expert Fred Espenak said in a prepared statement.

In the 21st century, there will be many tetrads, but look back a few centuries, and you’ll find the opposite phenomenon, Espenak said.

Before the dawn of the 20th century, there was a 300-year period when there were none, he said. Zero.

That would mean that neither Sir Isaac Newton, Mozart, Queen Anne, George Washington, Napoleon, Abraham Lincoln nor their contemporaries ever had a chance to see one.

So, we’re in luck. To take advantage of it, you’ll have to stay up late from Monday night into Tuesday.

People in North and South America will be able to see the entire eclipse, while sky watchers in the western Pacific can catch only the last half. The moon will be setting in most of Europe and Africa during the eclipse, so residents there probably won’t see much.

For gazing geeks, NASA has set up a live web chat to answer questions about the eclipse starting at 1 a.m. Eastern Time.

The heavenly curtain rises on Tuesday’s lunar review around 2 a.m. ET, when the moon starts to slide into Earth’s shadow.

It should turn into a blood moon — a coppery red — about an hour later and stay that way for over an hour, NASA says.

Tuesday’s blood moon comes right on time for the Jewish festival of Passover, which commemorates the ancient Israelites‘ exodus from slavery in Egypt. According to the Bible, God cast 10 plagues upon the Egyptians, the final plague being the death of the firstborn. The Israelites painted lamb’s blood on their doorways so that this plague would pass over their homes.

On Tuesday, April 15, there will be a total lunar eclipse that will turn the moon a coppery red, NASA says. It's called a blood moon, and it's one of four total eclipses that will take place in North America within the next year and a half. Pictured here is a blood moon seen over Gaza City in March 2007.

On Tuesday, April 15, there will be a total lunar eclipse that will turn the moon a coppery red, NASA says. It’s called a blood moon, and it’s one of four total eclipses that will take place in North America within the next year and a half. Pictured here is a blood moon seen over Gaza City in March 2007.

A total lunar eclipse is seen in Karachi, Pakistan, on December 10, 2011. It was the last full lunar eclipse.

The same lunar eclipse from December 2011 is seen here over the Golden Gate Bridge in San Francisco.

The December 2011 eclipse is seen near Moab, Utah. The moon takes on a reddish color as it passes through the Earth’s shadow, which is the color of a desert sunset.

The December 2011 eclipse, as seen from Kathmandu, Nepal. There are usually about two lunar eclipses per year, NASA says. But some of them are so subtle, they are vaguely visible and go greatly unnoticed. To get four blood moons in such a short period of time is very rare.

The moon is seen from Manila, Philippines, during the total lunar eclipse in December 2011.

The lunar eclipse in December 2011 is almost complete before it dips behind the Indian Peaks Wilderness area near Nederland, Colorado.

The moon, as seen from Manila during the December 2011 eclipse. The four upcoming blood moons will occur in roughly six-month intervals on the following dates: April 15; October 8; April 4, 2015; and September 28, 2015.

READ: Signs of underground ocean found on Saturn moon

 CNN.com.

 

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‘Blood moon’ rising : Total lunar eclipse on April 14-15, first in rare series

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A total lunar eclipse set to sweep the skies on April 14-15 and turn the moon blood-red just before midnight has got scientists excited and some Christians fearing for the end of days.

The coppery moon will be the first of two total lunar eclipses in 2014 as well as the opening act in a lunar tetrad – four total lunar eclipses in series.

A lunar eclipse occurs when the sun, Earth and moon align, causing the Earth’s shadow to fall on the moon, darkening it. The crimson color the moon takes on during an eclipse comes about because of the refraction of sunlight through the Earth’s atmosphere. This, incidentally, is the very same effect that causes sunsets to appear red.

The April 14-15 eclipse will begin at 21:20 GMT according to Sky and Telescope magazine. The other three eclipses in the “tetrad” will be in October, April 2015 and September 2015. Griffith Observatory will stream the event live.

A small group of Christians, however, view the upcoming event as a biblical prophecy sounding the end of times.

John Hagee, pastor and author of ‘Four Blood Moons: Something Is About to Change,’ cites Joel 2:31 as evidence, which says: “The sun will be turned into darkness, and the moon into blood, before the great and terrible day of the Lord come.”

Proponents of this Biblical prophesy also say it coincides with two important Jewish holidays – Passover and Tabernacles – contributing to the significance of the event.

However, writing for EarthSky.org, Bruce McClure and Deborah Byrd say that it’s no surprise that full moons would coincide with important Jewish holidays, as the Jewish calendar is, after all, a lunar calendar.

“In any year, it’s inevitable that a full moon should fall on or near the feasts of Passover (15 Nissan) and Tabernacles (15 Tishri). Nissan and Tishri are the first and seventh months of the Jewish calendar, respectively,” they said.

“It is somewhat ironic that three of these four lunar eclipses are not visible – even in part – from Israel.”

The pair argue that while the idea of a blood moon is one that lends itself to the imagination, the term is actually applicable to pretty much any total lunar eclipse.

“It’s only in years where volcanic activity is pronounced that the moon’s face during a total lunar eclipse might appear more brownish or gray in color. Usually, the moon looks red.”

Tetrads, while occurring less often than a blue moon, are not entirely rare. According to Byrd, there will be a total of eight lunar tetrads between 2001 and 2100. The last lunar tetrad occurred in 1967-1968.

This eclipse also features an additional astronomical anomaly, which is likely to spark the imagination. Byrd says Mars will appear “as a fiery red ‘star’ next to the moon. Together red Mars and the red shadow on the moon’s face should be a spectacular sight and an incredible photo opportunity.”

via ‘Blood moon’ rising: Total lunar eclipse on April 14-15, first in rare series — RT News.

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